Keith Harrison, Float, 2011 (opening night performance). Image: Jerwood Visual Arts
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Keith Harrison

Previous Awardees and Selectors

Launched in 2010, Jerwood Art Fund Makers Open (Formerly Jerwood Makers Open) is a biennial opportunity that recognises and promotes the significance of making practice and process within contemporary visual arts. It supports exceptional UK-based artist and makers within 1-10 years of beginning their practice to develop their creative ideas independently, enabling them to experiment, learn and take risks with substantial curatorial support.

To date, this initiative has invested over £250,000 directly to artists to support 34 new commissions that have been exhibited at 14 venues across the UK. It continues to respond to an ongoing dialogue around the place of materials, skills and processes in contemporary art practice.

Selectors for Jerwood Art Fund Makers Open 2021

Dame Magdalene Odundo 

Dame Magdalene Anyango Namakhiya Odundo DBE is a Kenyan-born British studio potter, who now lives in Farnham, Surrey. She has been Chancellor of the University for the Creative Arts since 2018. She received a DBE for her contribution to Art and Arts Education in 2020. In 2019 she was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award at the International Ceramics Festival and solo exhibition Magdalene Odundo – The Journey of Things took place at The Hepworth and Sainsbury Centre (2019). magdaleneodundo.com

 

Yinka Ilori 

Yinka Ilori is a London-based multidisciplinary artist of a British-Nigerian heritage, who specializes in storytelling by fusing his British and Nigerian heritage to tell new stories in contemporary design. Humorous, provocative and fun, every project that he creates tells a story. Bringing Nigerian verbal traditional into playful conversation with contemporary design, Yinka Ilori’s work touches on various global themes that resonate with different audiences all over the world. Yinka was Elle Decoration New Designer 2019. Recent exhibitions and commissions include Why Craft Matters, Harewood House (2019), Colour Palace, Dulwich Picture Gallery (2019), ITV Creates (2019). yinkailori.com

 

Junko Mori 

Having studied both in Tokyo and London, Junko Mori’s core concept, “growing forms through repetition” evolved during this period. She is best known for her sculptural forms assembled with many hand-forged metal components. Her works have been collected by numerous international galleries and museums. Currently, she lives in the remote countryside in North Wales. junkomori.com

 

Christine Rew 

Christine Rew is Art Gallery & Museums Manager at Aberdeen Art Gallery & Museums. Christine also headed up the redevelopment project for the Art Gallery and Cowdray Hall along with the creation of a new Museum Collections Centre which opened to visitors in 2016. aagm.co.uk

 

Harriet Cooper

Harriet Cooper is Head of Visual Arts at Jerwood Arts where she is responsible for developing and leading their visual arts work including projects, partnerships, funding, research and awards. She leads Jerwood Arts’ gallery programme in London and on tour around the UK and was curator of recent exhibition ‘Collaborate!’ which showcased new commissions from early-career artist groups, collaborative practices and collectives. Prior to this Harriet held roles at Firstsite, the British Council, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Tate Liverpool and The Whitworth Art Gallery; and was co-curator of Phyllida Barlow’s commission ‘folly’ for the British Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017. jerwoodarts.org

Selected artists by year:

2019

Mark Corfield-Moore’s most recent work focuses on the process of weaving. For Jerwood Makers Open, he has travelled to locations in northern Thailand and the Scottish Highlands to study the weaving practices of these rural communities. Inspired by the distinctive blurred appearance achieved using Asian ikat techniques he is weaving three new works that explore fireworks and their relationship to time, memory and the history of textiles. markcorfieldmoore.com

Forest + Found’s practice draws upon a background in painting and sculpture, whilst looking towards a newly developed language of craft. Driven by a deep relationship to the land, they are working with raw materials sourced directly from Epping Forest and Sussex woodland to create a series of grounded vessels reflected in the abstract plane of a large textile wall-piece. They extracted resin and tar from cedar wood trees to develop a new pigment as well as investigating natural colours and ways of extracting pigment from by-products of charcoal burns. forest-andfound.com

Lucie Gledhill works with precious metals as a chain maker and uses techniques such as weaving wire and making chain in a repetitive method similar to weaving and embroidering textiles. For Jerwood Makers Open, she created a series of large hand-carved sculptural curb chains, exploring new materials and scale. For the commission, Lucie worked with the materials: wood, steel, silver. luciegledhill.com

Taking the controversy over Sheffield City Council’s felling of street trees and intertwining this with archival, poetic and art historical sources, Bethan Lloyd Worthington made a large wall piece made up of distinct ceramic objects, arranged to form one composition. She used ceramic techniques such as experimental glazes, slipware and dendritic mocha ware processes, with a focus on the colour green both in terms of its chemistry in ceramics and its wider social meanings. The piece also included a risograph pamphlet printed by Hato Press, featuring a new experimental text written by the artist, which draws from and is inspired by the different strands of research underlying her commission. bethanlloydworthington.com

Tana West works predominantly with ceramic processes, using the language of ceramic materials and object making to connect with social, political and historical contexts. She created a ceramic version of a hall of black mirrors, in the mode of a funfair where the glaze surface of the mirrors distorts to have an obscure or imperfect vision of reality. tanawest.co.uk

You can watch talks by the artists from this edition for the Making Conversation event programme to coincide with Jerwood Makers Open 2019 exhibition at Jerwood Space.

Find out more about this edition and plan your visit… 

2017

Sam Bakewell has a history of working with clay, for this exhibition he uses wood for the first time. He will make a series of polychromed objects, carved with a chainsaw and chisel, which will form enlarged abstracts with details referencing historic carving. These will include water, fire, hair and animals, expanding on his interests in the philosophy and symbolism of the spiral as archetypal form. corvi-mora.com

Marcin Rusak’s work reflects on consumer culture, his work for this exhibition will be an installation made from perishable objects. The product designer will create several pieces using organic composites, such as waste flowers, shellac, beeswax and resin in different stages of decay. Playing with the processes of destruction, renewal and reconstruction, the work will stimulate questions about history and possible future scenarios. marcinrusak.com

Laura Youngson Coll’s work uses knowledge of sculpture, book-binding and leatherworking to create a fictitious yet scientific depiction of the natural world in her work. Her work for the exhibition was a series of pieces made from vellum, which is calfskin parchment, examining the cellular morphology of lymphoma, personally significant after the illness and subsequent death of her partner. This microscopic perspective, familiar in her practice, reflects the idea of assimilating events in a highly personal way and will examine the reconciliation of scientific explanation with personal experience of illness. laurayoungsoncoll.co.uk

Juli Bolaños-Durman’s work for the exhibition explored the journey of transformation which takes place as she converts ordinary objects into objets d’art. She made colourful large-scale glass installation made of many intricately cut sculptures, using found and blown glass and create an intimate atmosphere between the creature-like figurines which come to life with dramatic lighting. julibd.com

Jessica Harrison’s work for the exhibition was a new body of sculptural objects in porcelain and bone china that explores the notion of the collection, as an aspiration, a physical grouping and a framework that structures the viewer and their movements and sensory experiences. jessicaharrison.studio

Find out more about this edition… 

 

2015

Zachary Eastwood-Bloom hand-crafted a ceramic wall constructed using a number of three-dimensional, mesh-like cubes. These formed an imposing structure which bisected the gallery space and was an extension of Zachary’s previous work exploring the relationship between digitisation and materiality.

Malene Hartmann Rasmussen made an immersive, large-scale installation. Her theatrical and surreal ceramic forest utilised trompe l’oeil and is made of life-size scenic images of trees scaled up from tiny models with hand-crafted branches. The immersive woodland was a fairytale-esque space of ceramic flora and fauna with indications of narrative scenarios. It extended Malene’s previous work around motifs from domestic and natural environments, layered with the artist’s memories, daydreams and childhood nostalgia.

Jasleen Kaur cast a trio of busts in hand-marbled plastic drawing on parallels between Indian devotional sculpture and traditional western portrait busts. The busts each depict a figure that represents a meeting point between opposing cultural ideas: Jasleen’s great-grandfather, her first ancestor to migrate from India to Glasgow; the Palestinian American Edward Said; and the current Lord Napier, great-grandson of a central figure in the story of British India. The work subverts materials and subjects from the revered to the everyday. This personal content drawing on her upbringing in a traditional Indian household in Glasgow and denotes a fascination with the malleability of culture.

Ian McIntyre made and fired a ton of white ceramic tableware, stacked in towering columns composed of hundreds of plates, cups and bowls. The work takes inspiration from production potter Isaac Button, who worked on an industrial scale. A Ton of Clay was the first case study in McIntyre’s wider body of research, which examines the role of the maker and their potential to act as a catalyst for industrial innovation. This work extended Ian’s previous work as a designer, working predominantly with ceramics at the intersection where craft meets industrial production.

Multi-disciplinary design Studio Silo (Attua Aparicio and Oscar Wanless) cast bowls using a unique self-developed production technique for inertial casting. For the exhibition, Silo Studio utilised new materials and was the product of new developments in Silo Studio’s machinery to further manipulate the casting process and is inspired by the principles of Newton’s bucket.

Find out more about this edition… 

2014

Hitomi Hosono made a series of delicate sculptures from porcelain inspired by the vibrancy of the South Pacific. This work marked the first time Hitomi has experimented with the use of colour in her botanical forms. hitomihosono.com

Matthew Raw made a life-sized ceramic-tiled façade of a British pub inspired by historic turn-of-the-century designs and contemporary issues of gentrification. The work extends Matthew’s use of ceramics to fuse a relationship between narrative and structure. mraw.co.uk

Revital Cohen and Tuur Van Balen’s work for this exhibition explored production processes within making and design to create a series of hand-crafted LED signs, which display fragments of text that come from the process of sourcing electronic components from China. Composed of sentences that have been either lost, or perhaps found in translation, the piece, called Giving More to Gain More, encapsulates the poetic moment in which computerised systems reinterpret language. cohenvanbalen.com

Shelley James, whose practice investigates new techniques and the creative possibilities of glass, developed a new series of glassworks rooted in new scientific explorations of perception and the way we view space. shelleyjames.co.uk

FleaFollyArchitects’s work for this exhibition involved creating a fictional universe using the themes and characters from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as a metaphor for our digital age, especially how the Internet has changed from a tool for good to an uncontrollable monster of our own making. The 4m-tall work re-imagined Shelly’s monster as electronic archive situated in the Arctic Circle, which holds all of humanity’s existing and future digital information. fleafollyarchitects.com

Find out more about this edition… 

2013

Maisie Broadhead made four photographic tableaux featuring props inspired by Renaissance painter Paolo Veronese’s series Allegory of Love (1575). Maisie developed costumes and handmade props from wood, glass, plastic and metal to use in each of the scenes, which reinterpret Veronese’s works Scorn, Unfaithfulness, Respect and Happy Union with contemporary symbolism, wit and humour. maisiebroadhead.com

Linda Brothwell made a series of handmade tools, including hammers, chisels and shims to document the equipment being used to restore Portland Works, a heritage-rich site that was Sheffield’s first purpose-built cutlery factory. The work extends Linda’s existing practice of exploring traditional craft process, increasingly rare techniques and regional heritage. lindabrothwell.com

Adam Buick made a series of hand-thrown porcelain bells, installed in a variety of natural spaces such as hidden sea caves found in his native Pembrokeshire. The work presents these bells alongside video and photographs of them in situ, highlighting the striking architectural properties of these often overlooked environments. Best known for his handcrafted Korean Moon Jars, combining sculpture with film for this exhibition is a new direction for the artist. adambuick.com

Nahoko Kojima made an intricate sculpture of a swimming polar bear created using kiri-e, a form of Japanese paper-cutting that she is known for spearheading in Europe. The 2.5m piece, called Byaku, was hand-cut from a single sheet of Japanese washi paper with one continuous line and hangs from the ceiling to allow the piece to play with shadow and light. nahokokojima.com

Roanna Wells’ large-scale embroidery work was inspired by the Kumbh Mela celebrations in India. Commissioning her own aerial photography of the event, Roanna used hand-stitching techniques on sheer silk and wool to map out the spontaneous patterns and abstract representations of the crowd as seen from above. The work extends Roanna’s interest in the boundaries between drawing and textiles. roannawells.co.uk

Find out more about this edition… 

2012

Nao Matsunaga’s work for this exhibition used hand-formed clay and brightly-painted wood to create a series of sculptures inspired by the overlooked heritage of ceramic architecture, focusing in this instance on ceramics used in ceremonial structures. His organic, cloud-like shrine is larger than any other freestanding ceramic sculpture he had made before. naomatsunaga.com

James Rigler’s work for this exhibition involved three monuments: a 2.4m-high obelisk, a statue of a giant hand, and an archway, their grandeur undermined by his use of everyday materials such as fabric, wood, paint and metal. Through these structures, he explores the hierarchy of objects and the qualities that distinguish something from being ordinary or extraordinary. jamesriglerstudio.com

William Shannon’s work for this exhibition involves a 4x4ft pottery workshop, complete with a fictional potter and a working kiln that produces real pots from locally-sourced London clay. The piece is the last in a series of five works where Shannon develops fictional tradesmen, their tools and working environments. The series posed questions about how and where material things are made and suggests ways in which local materials and manufacture could allow new, lightweight industries to be reintroduced to the city. willshannon.co.uk

Louis Thompson’s work for this exhibition featured a series of blown glass forms designed to challenge and tease the viewer. The works combine water and light and use shadow, reflection, distortion and illusion to force the viewer to question the structure and production process of each piece. The work extends Louis’ previous interest in repetition, sequence and multiple, and the aesthetics of medical and scientific apparatus. louisthompson.com

Silvia Weidenbach’s work for this exhibition included three chunky necklaces inspired by found objects, experimenting for the first time with a new process that combines 3D printing with traditional jewellery-making techniques. After photographing the found objects, she manipulated the images using a digital symmetry computer programme, before making prototypes of the forms using a 3D printer. These were adapted and cast in resin, silver or titanium before being embellished with precious and semi-precious stones. silviaweidenbach.com

Find out more about this edition…

2011

Farah Bandookwala made jewellery forms using high-tech processes such as rapid prototyping. Her work for this exhibition involved a collection of brightly-coloured, sculptural objects that light up, vibrate or move in response to human interaction.

Emmanuel Boos made an installation of richly-coloured cobblestone forms and a series of flat wall pieces which chart his studies of glaze – his fascination with its texture, colours and tones and his interest in the domesticity of objects. emmanuelboos.info

Heike Brachlow created a series of different-sized glass sculptures based on balancing toys, where form and weight distribution allow objects to move freely on a single point of contact. The glass varies in thickness and the changing light throughout the day alters the tones of each piece. heikebrachlow.com

Keith Harrison built a ceramic reggae dub sound system with which he recreated a scene in Werner Herzog‘s film Fitzcarraldo where the central character voyages up the Pachitea River playing Caruso records from a gramophone perched on a steamer. Exchanging the gramophone for a wall of speakers, Harrison played music from the film on ceramic records, echoing a formative experience watching the Jah Shaka sound system at St George’s Hall, Exeter, in 1994. keith-harrison.info

Find out more about this edition… 

 

Image credits top to bottom: (1) Magdalene Odundo, The Journey of Things at The Hepworth Wakefield, 2019. Photo: Charlotte Graham - CAG Photography. (2) Yinka Ilori. Photo: Andy Stagg. Yinka Ilori, Colour Palace, 2019. Installation View at Dulwich Picture Gallery. Photo: Andy Stagg. (3) Junko Mori with her steel and silver Botany/Horsetail, 2018. Photo: Adrian Sassoon, London. (4) Christine Rew. Photo: Aberdeen Art Gallery & Museums. (5) Harriet Cooper at Jerwood Collaborate!, supported by Jerwood Arts, 2019. Photo: Hydar Dewachi. (6) Mark Corfield-Moore, Celestial Meteors, 2019 (left); Nitrous Flame, 2019 (right). Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2019, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (7) Forest + Found, The Subjective Element, 2019. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2019, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (8) Lucie Gledhill, Chain, 2019. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2019, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (8) Bethan Lloyd Worthington, Making all the greens unstable, 2019. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2019, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (9) Tana West, Through a Glass Darkly, 2019. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2019, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (10) Sam Bakewell, razed / raised (seat), 2017. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2017, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (11) Juli Bolaños-Durman, Musings, 2017. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2017, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (12) Jessica Harrison, 54 Pins, 44 Followers, 2017. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2017, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (13) Marcin Rusak, Nature of Things, 2017. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2017, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (14) Laura Youngson Coll, Pathogenesis, 2016. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2017, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (15) Zachary Eastwood-Bloom, Partition, 2015. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2015, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (16) Malene Hartmann Rasmussen, In The Dead Of Night, 2015. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2015, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (17) Jasleen Kaur, Marbled Busts, 2015. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2015, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (18) Ian McIntyre, A Ton of Clay, 2015. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2015, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (19) Silo Studio, Newton's Bucket, 2015. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2015, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Anna Arca. (20) Hitomi Hosono, 2014. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2014, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: thisistomorrow.info. (21) Matthew Raw, The Shifting Spirit, 2014. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2014, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: thisistomorrow.info. (22) Revital Cohen and Tuur Van Balen, Giving More to Gain More, 2014. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2014, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: thisistomorrow.info. (23) Shelley James, Essential Symmetry, 2014. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2014, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: thisistomorrow.info. (24) FleaFollyArchitects, Modern Prometheus, 2014. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2014, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: thisistomorrow.info. (25) Maisie Broadhead, Other Allegories of Love, 2013. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2013, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: thisistomorrow.info. (26) Linda Brothwell, Acts Of Care: The Sheffield Edition, 2013. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2013, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: thisistomorrow.info. (27) Adam Buick, Veneration Bells, 2013. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2013, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: thisistomorrow.info. (28) Nahoko Kojima, Byaku, 2013. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2013, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: thisistomorrow.info. (28) Roanna Wells, Sea of Faith, 2013. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2013, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: thisistomorrow.info. (29) Nao Matsunaga, Palace of Coming and Going, 2012. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2012, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Thomas Rydin. (30) William Shannon, Kiln House, 2012. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2012, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Thomas Rydin. (31) Louis Thompson, Hive, 2012. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2012, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Thomas Rydin. (32) James Rigler, Precinct, 2012. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2012, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Thomas Rydin. (33) Silvia Weidenbach, Fractal Invention Don't Go For The Rollercoaster, 2012. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2012, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Thomas Rydin. (34) Farah Bandookwala, Flicker, 2011. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2011, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Thomas Rydin. (35) Emmanuel Boos 'Cobblestones', 2011. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2011, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Thomas Rydin. (36) Heike Brachlow 'Avis I', 2011. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2011, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. (37) Keith Harrison, Float, 2011. Commissioned for Jerwood Makers Open 2011, supported by Jerwood Arts. Installation view at Jerwood Space. Photo: Thomas Rydin.