Jerwood Moving Image Awards 2008

David Blandy, Sophie Clements, Richard Forbes-Hamilton, Laurie Hill, Johnny Kelly, Rosie Pedlow and Joe King, George Wu and Bonnie Carr

New works by eight moving image artists David Blandy, Sophie Clements, Richard Forbes-Hamilton, Laurie Hill, Johnny Kelly, Rosie Pedlow and Joe King and George Wu and  Bonnie Carr.The three awardees are Sophie Clements, Johnny Kelly, and Rosie Pedlow and Joe King.

The works draw on a diverse array of digital moving image practices: animation, film, documentary, video, music, installation, drawing, dance and performance. Works from the shortlist appear online during the exhibition to be viewed and downloaded onto laptops, telephones and MP3 players.Together the films present a snapshot of the cutting edge of contemporary practice in this emerging artform.

Sophie Clements’ work Evensong was conceived as a piece of visual music, and in its delicate and sublime layering of sound and colour manages to fuse sensory experiences, and demonstrates the technical mastery of its maker.

Johnny Kelly’s work Procrastination is a vivid and funny account of putting things off, a human experience that anyone can relate to, and whose humour is derived from the sparkling interplay between the droll script and the dazzling visuals

Rosie Pedlow and Joe King’s work Sea Change comes from a very different filmmaking tradition, and is a beautiful portrait of a coastal community in a time of change.

The eight artists were selected from a shorlist of 30 works made from over 350 submission on response to and open call to UK based moving image artists within 10 years of graduating of establishing their practice. The three winners, each received £10,000. The selectors were : dancer and choreographer Wayne McGregor (chair);  Marc Boothe, independent producer and founder of B3 Media; John Maeda, Head of MIT’s Media Lab; artist Jane Prophet; journalist, author and historian Sukhdev Sandhu and Jules Wright, Director for the Wapping Project.

The Jerwood Moving Image Awards were established to support and promote the myriad disciplines that fall under the umbrella term ‘digital moving image’, and to provide a platform for debating the present state and future prospects of the artform They ran from 2008-2009 and endorsed new practices in contemporary art, offering funding and support for emerging artists working with new technologies.

Rosie Pedlow and Joe King, Sea Change, 2008 (still)